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ESSO International Tankers 1920-1929
John Worthington - (1920-1943)
See also : SS John Worthington : From WW II Working-class Heroe to Artificial Reef

See also : COOLNESS AND DECISION  &  German Records off the Attack on the SS "John Worthington"

The SS "John Worthington" at anchor after a snowstorm.

 Source : Pacific Marine Review, Volume 17, December 1920.
Standifer Launches
The G. M. Standifer Construction Corporation, Vancouver, Washington, has launched the tanker John Worthington, the first of five 12,000-ton steel vessels being built for the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey. She was christened by Mrs. W. T. Johnson, daughter of Mr. Worthington. The John Worthington is the largest vessel to be launched on the Willamette or Columbia river.

 
"John Worthington" deck view.
 
SS "John Worthington" Silhouette drawing.
( Drawing by Andrew Hall 1995 )
Torpedo damage SS "John Worthington", May 27, 1943.
Looking straight into the torpedo hole in the hull of SS "John Worthington". Repairs underway.
SS "John Worthington".

The Miramar Ship Index for "JOHN WORTHINGTON"
IDNo:
2220946
Year:
1920
Name:
JOHN WORTHINGTON
Keel:
Type:
Tanker
Launch Date:
15.11.1920
Flag:
USA
Date of completion:
12.1920

Tons:
8194
Link:
-
DWT:
12475
Yard No:
16
Length overall:
145.62
Ship Design:
LPP:
141.2
Country of build:
USA
Beam:
18.3
Builder:
Standifer
Material of build:
Location of yard:
Vancouver, Wa.
Number of screws/Mchy/Speed(kn):
1Q-10.5

Subsequent History:
-

Disposal Data:
sm/t 3.52S/36.48W 27.5.43 & scuttled near Port Aransas 04.1944.

History:
ON
LR/IMO
ID
Year
Name
Tons
Change
Registered Owner
220946
2220946
1920
JOHN WORTHINGTON
8194
-
Standard Oil Co., New Jersey
220946
2220946
1920
JOHN WORTHINGTON
8194
1927
Standard Sg.,Co Inc.
220946
2220946
1920
JOHN WORTHINGTON
8194
1935
Standard Oil Co.,New Jersey
220946
2220946
1920
JOHN WORTHINGTON
8194
1943
Panama Tpt., Co.

Sisterships are Chester O. Swain, W. H. Libby, Livingstone Roe and Christy Payne.

  Photobucket
Map of the wreckage of the SS "John Worthington".
  Photobucket
Position of the wreckage of the SS "John Worthington".

Additional Info by Starke & Schell Registers :

JOHN WORTHINGTON - 1902  USA  1Q (aft)     (10½)
8,194 GRT for Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey), New York    462.4 x 60.2
Tanker built by G. M. Standifer Construction Corp., Vancouver, Wash.   (12)  #16    220946
1927 - Standard Shipping Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.
1935 - Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey, Wilmington, Del.
1943 - Panama Transport Co., Panama     PA
Torpedoed by U 154, 27 May 1943, in 03.52 S-36.48 W, voyage Bahia - Caripito, in ballast,
arrived Galveston 21 June 1943 for survey, CTL,
sold for scrap to General Export Iron & Metal Co., Port Aransas, Texas,
scrapping began 27.03.1944 but never completed, hull abandoned in Lydia Ann Channel,
1½ miles NE of Port Aransas.

Additional information from Uboat.net :

Name: John Worthington
Type: Steam tanker
Tonnage: 8.166 tons
Completed: 1920 - G.M. Standifer Construction Corp, Vancouver WA
Owner: Standard Oil Co of New Jersey, New York
Homeport: Wilmington
Date of attack: 28 May, 1943
Nationality: American
Fate: A total loss by U-154 (Oskar-Heinz Kusch)
Position: 03.52S, 36.48W - Grid FB 9621
- See location on a map -
Complement: 56 (0 dead and 56 survivors).
Convoy: BT-14
Route: Rio de Janeiro - Bahia, Brazil - Trinidad
Cargo: Water ballast
History: -
Notes on loss:
Between 04.43 and 04.46 hours on 28 May 1943, U-154 fired six torpedoes at the convoy BT-14 about 125 miles east of Fortaleza,
Brazil and reported one tanker damaged, one freighter sunk, one tanker probably sunk and two more freighters sunk. In fact each
of the three ships Florida in station # 53, Cardinal Gibbons in station # 61 and John Worthington in station # 42 were hit by one
torpedo and all reached port safely, but the last ship was never repaired.
The John Worthington (Master Gunnar Gjertsen) was struck by one torpedo at the # 8 tank. The explosion blew a hole 30 feet by
10 feet in her side, buckled the deck and pushed fragments out the port side. The ship veered 30° to starboard, but regained her
course and continued on her way, rejoining the convoy the next morning. Only a few of the eight officers, 34 crewmen and 14 armed
guards (the ship was armed with one 4in, one 3in, two .50cal and two .30cal guns) suffered slight injuries. After temporary repairs
at Trinidad the ship was sailed on 10 June to Galveston, Texas for major repairs, arriving on 21 June. But the tanker was never
repaired and did not return to service, but never completed, hull abandoned in Lydia Ann Channel,1½ miles NE of Port Aransas.